What’s Your Verb?

July 15, 2014
Jennifer Ford Reedy addressing the YNPN National Conference

Jennifer Ford Reedy addressing the YNPN National Conference

A couple of weeks ago, the national conference of the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network came to Minneapolis. As a board member of the local chapter, I was thrilled to see so many young leaders from around the country in town and for them to hear Jennifer Ford Reedy of the Bush Foundation during day two’s opening keynote.

One insight from Reedy’s keynote in particular has been sticking with me and others who attended. It came during her description of her career path and how she figured out what her dream job was. A lot of her career, she said, involved doing a good job and seeing what new opportunities emerged, but there was a pivotal moment — involving deep thinking and visualizing her dream job — that got her to where she is today.

That moment came with a question from a CEO she’d been working with. The question wasn’t, “What’s your dream job?” Instead the CEO asked, “Can we fund you to be you and keep doing what you’re doing in the community?” Reedy knew that wasn’t feasible and that she’d need to have a platform and a place to belong. But it did get her thinking, “What do I want to do? Not what job do I want, but what is the verb in my life?”

She thought about what she was good at, what she enjoyed doing and the impact she wanted to have. From there she considered organizations she could be a part of that would allow her to do that. That frame of mind allowed her to make conscious choices that led her to Bush Foundation.

Reedy’s story demonstrated that the familiar question about someone’s dream job might have it backwards. The most important thing to know is what you’ll be happy doing. The best place to do it flows from there, not vice versa. So what about it, what’s your verb?

Watch Reedy’s full keynote and Q&A session from the conference below:

- Chris Oien, MCF digital communications specialist


Giving USA Comes Bearing Good News!

June 19, 2014

gusaI attended the St. Paul stop on Giving USA’s 2014 road show this morning. There, Adam Wilhelm of Campbell & Company updated us on 2013 national giving trends, which can be summarized as good news.

According to Wilhelm and Giving USA 2014, total charitable giving in the U.S. rose 3% (adjusted for inflation) between 2012 and 2013 to $335.17 billion. This is an increase of 12% since the start of the Great Recession, and Wilhelm predicts the U.S. will pass the pre-recession high of $350 billion in charitable giving in a year or two.

Wilhelm says, “Wealthy individuals are feeling good about their accumulated wealth, so it is a good time to talk to them about their giving.”

According to Giving USA, wealthy donors are giving to their favorite charities — including universities, hospitals and arts institutions — so overall giving in those areas is up. Meanwhile, giving to social service and church groups — more dependent on the financially squeezed middle-class — is flat.

In 2013:

  • Giving by individuals — the largest slice of the pie at 72% — totaled $240.60 billion, up 2.7% over 2012.
  • Giving by foundations — now 15% of total giving — was up 4.2% to $48.96 billion. This increase was driven in part by a 10.5% increase in giving by community foundations.
  • Giving by bequest through a will or estate plan — 8% of the total — was up 7.2% to $27.73 billion.
  • Only corporate giving — 5% of the total — was down 3.2% to $17.88 billion, the result of a slow rate of growth in pre-tax corporate profits last year. Corporate trends of increased in-kind and global giving continue.

What Organizations are Benefiting?

  1. Religion was the top recipient of gifts, but total giving to religion continues to slide. It went down slightly in 2013 to 31% of the total or $105.5 billion, which represents the lowest percent given to religion in 40 years.
  2. Overall giving to Education increased by 7.4% (2013′s largest increase) to $52.07 billion.
  3. Giving to Human Services was fairly flat, increasing by .7% to $41.51 billion.
  4. Giving to Health was up by 4.5% to $31.86 billion.
  5. Giving to Public Affairs/Society Benefit (which includes giving to donor-advised funds) was up 7% to $23.89 billion.
  6. Giving to Arts, Culture and Humanities was up by 6.3% to $16.66 billion.
  7. Giving to International Affairs fell to $14.93 billion (due to fewer disasters worldwide in 2013).
  8. Giving to Animal Welfare and Environment increased to $9.72 billion (due to larger investments in climate change and anti-fracking initiatives).

Takeaways from event panelists included the following: 

  • Individual giving is a growth market. Giving by other sectors is not growing as quickly.
  • More and more often, individual donors are researching charities and want to see the impact of their gifts.
  • If your organization is not doing planned giving, it should at least be doing bequests. “It’s easy!”

Visit Giving USA for much more information or to purchase Giving USA 2014.

For more information on Minnesota giving, visit mcf.org/research

- Susan Stehling, MCF communications associate

 



What Do the Latest Giving Trends Mean for Minnesota?

May 15, 2014

afpStaff of foundations and nonprofit organizations alike look to the annual Giving USA report for insights on the latest giving trends and what they mean for Minnesota.

Giving USA 2014 will be released on Tuesday, June 17, and the release will be quickly followed by “first look” events in seven cities — including St. Paul — across the nation.

If you’d like to be among the first to hear expert analysis and local perspectives on the 2014 findings, attend First Look: Giving USA 2014  presented by Campbell & Company in conjunction with the Association of Fundraising Professionals Minnesota (AFPMN).

The event in St. Paul will take place on Thursday, June 19, from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m., at the Town and Country Club, where a presentation of report findings will be followed by a moderated panel of local experts.

Registration is $20 for AFPMN members and $40 for non-members; breakfast is included. See afpminnesota.org/event/first-look-giving-usa-2014/ for details and a link to register.

The report is used by grantmakers and nonprofits to:

  • Benchmark fundraising performance against national data;
  • Plan for the future, based on long-term trends in giving;
  • Educate new staff members and board members in the broad context of philanthropic giving, so they have a better understanding of their organization’s funding patterns; and
  • Strengthen grantmaking and other philanthropic activities.

Giving USA: 2014 was compiled by The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University for the Giving USA Foundation.

- Susan Stehling, MCF communications associate


Bush Foundation Launches Leadership Network Grants

April 24, 2014

Bush-AltLogo-ColorFor decades, the Bush Foundation has worked on leadership development in Minnesota and the surrounding region. Earlier this week, it announced a new grant program with that focus.

The new Leadership Network Grant program supports organizations working to inspire, equip and connect leaders to effectively lead change. Grants of up to $200,000 will support efforts that:

  • Inspire and equip people to successfully lead in their communities
  • Connect people of different backgrounds and perspectives across geographies, sectors, ideological divides or cultural communities

Bush Foundation is particularly interested in proposals that build the cultural agility of leaders or expand leadership development opportunities for communities underrepresented in leadership positions in our region.

It is accepting applications now through June 12, 2014. Access the application and learn more about the grants on the foundation’s website.


Inequities – Experienced by Some – Threaten All

April 23, 2014

FRSeveral days ago I received an email from Marketplace with the subject line: Forget the 1%. The 0.01% owns 12% of all wealth in America. When I clicked through, things got worse: Around 50 percent of the US population has zero net wealth. Their debts, effectively, equal their assets.

Despite some familiarity with income inequality and persistent poverty in the U.S., the reality of so much being owned by so few and of so many owning nothing at all hit hard.

Even with the Great Recession behind us, numbers that reinforce the harsh realities of racial and economic disparity are released daily. “The Urgency of Now: Foundations’ Role in Ending Racial Inequity” in the latest issue of The Foundation Review presents many of the issues and the depth of the challenge we find ourselves in. It surveys philanthropy’s evolution in addressing poverty and traces a long history of the racialization of institutions and systems.

But the article, by Gary Cunningham, Northwest Area Foundation; Marcia Avner, University of Minnesota — Duluth; and Romilda Justilien, BCT Partners also explores multiple approaches that foundations can use to advance racial equity and prosperity. And it offers specific approaches used by the Northwest Area Foundation, an MCF member, that others working for equity could also employ.

MCF and many of its members work in multiple ways to advance equity. By equity, we mean the conditions that will exist when factors such as racial, ethnic, economic and geographic differences are no longer predictors of life outcomes. We believe it’s important because inequities experienced by some threaten the future prosperity of all.

- Susan Stehling, MCF communications associate


Fast Forward with Philanthropy’s Big Thinkers

April 22, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 12.09.07 PMMCF is pleased to announce the launch of our new Fast Forward series!

Through these monthly videos and periodic podcasts of interviews by MCF President Trista Harris, Fast Forward will feature conversations with big thinkers in the field of philanthropy.

You’ll learn about the latest trends in Minnesota grantmaking, gain insights on strategies behind important philanthropic efforts and come away inspired with ideas and approaches you can take back to your organization.

We’re launching with an interview with Margaret A. Cargill Foundation’s Mark Lindberg, director of the Relief and Resilience program. Here, Mark tells Trista about the foundation’s work in the area of disaster relief and resiliency building, its focus on lower-attention events that don’t typically receive much philanthropic support and its interest in engaging local community members as key partners:

The full transcript of this interview is available on our website, which is also where you’ll also find new Fast Forward episodes as we produce them. Interview highlights are also featured in the spring issue of Giving Forum, in your mailbox soon.

Let us know what you think! And look for a conversation with Phil Buchanan of the Center for Effective Philanthropy to come in May.


Apply Now for the 2014 Bush Prize

April 9, 2014

Bush-AltLogo-ColorYesterday, the Bush Foundation announced it has opened applications for its 2014 Bush Prize for Community Innovation. This prize honors and supports innovative organizations with a track record of making great ideas happen. The Bush Prize provides creative capital for the organizations to use however they choose.

Open to public charities and government entities in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and 23 Native nations that share the same geography, selection criteria for the Bush Prize include:

  • Does the organization have a pattern of innovative solutions?
  • Does the organization have a pattern of using inclusive, collaborative and resourceful processes?
  • Does the organizational leadership foster a culture of innovation?
  • Is the organization stable and strong in terms of governance and finance?

Applications are due June 5. Finalists will be chosen in July, with site visits in August and September. Winners will be selected in November, with funds dispersed in December.

Prize winners receive a package of recognition, along with a flexible grant of 25% of the organization’s last fiscal year budget, up to $500,000. See the stories of the nine winners from 2013.

Visit the Bush Foundation’s website for all the details and to access the online application. Best of luck to those applying!

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,497 other followers