Philanthropy’s Role in Disaster Relief

June 9, 2014
Damage from the 2009 Minneapolis tornado.

Damage from the 2009 Minneapolis tornado.

In December 2013, MCF’s board adopted the following policy statement:

Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery: MCF will promote disaster preparedness, response and recovery, and long-term recovery policies and procedures that involve marginalized communities, respond to their needs and define a realistic and effective role for philanthropy.

In May 2014, MCF’s Government Relations and Public Policy committee invited Holly Sampson, president of the Duluth Superior Area Community Foundation, and Erik Torch, grant program manager of the Northland Foundation, to share their experiences and lessons-learned since extensive flooding in 2012.

Presentation Highlights

  • One hundred-year weather events now happen every few years. Vulnerable populations — including seniors, those living in poverty, the mentally ill and those already living on the edge — endure the greatest and longest lasting challenges.
  • There is an immediate need for a common data system to track those affected, their needs and how they have been met. Because this doesn’t currently exist, disaster victims must “shop for aid.” This is unacceptable.
  • Recovery will take longer than expected. Disaster declarations, insurance pay offs and buy-out programs may take months or years. During this time, people can’t live in their old homes, but they must continue to pay those expenses along with expenses associated with new housing. This is a financial disaster for families.
  • Low-income and rental housing was hit hard. Landlords may leave it up to renters, without financial resources, to respond. There are not programs to replace renters’ possessions.
  • In Duluth, $2.7 million in private giving is being used to fix what insurance and the private sector could not. More and more, private giving is relied upon in these situations.
  • Disaster relief efforts require regional, institutional and cross-sector response teams. No one sector can do it alone. Grantmakers need to strategize preparation and recovery efforts to effectively serve families and stabilize communities.

Upcoming MCF Bus Tour

On August 11, 2014, MCF will sponsor a bus tour and workshop, “Responding to Minnesota’s New Reality of Disaster Relief,” to explore grantmaking and public policy responses to disaster preparedness, relief and recovery in Minnesota. Watch our events calendar for a listing — coming soon — or contact Tara Kumar to ensure you’re included.

How Funders in Other Hard-hit States are Responding:

Jesse Ball duPont Fund

After a deadly 2011 tornado hit Alabama, Jessie Ball duPont Fund published Creating Order from Chaos to help foundations identify their roles and points of entry in response to disaster planning and recovery. Its framework names three fundamental stages of disaster response and recovery.

  1. Planning and Preparation: community members, grantmakers and local officials create a system to support the community in case of disaster.
  2. First Response: occurs directly after a disaster occurs. Critical moment where federal and community agencies provide immediate resources and support to communities and families.
  3. Recovery and Rebuilding: federal and local leaders work toward rebuilding community and families to state of health.

Long after disasters hit and federal resources are spent, communities will still need help. Philanthropy can play a role by providing long-term sustainable engagement before and after a natural disaster.

The Rockefeller Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation takes an innovative approach, working with communities to build resilience when hit by disaster and other stressors. It defines resilience as “the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, business and systems within a city to survive, adapt and grow no matter what kinds of chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience.”

It has identified five core characteristics of resilient communities:

  1. Constant Learning: The ability to internalize past experiences linked with robust feedback loops that sense, provide foresight and allow new solutions.
  2. Rapid Rebound: The capacity to re-establish function, re-organize and avoid long-term disruption.
  3. Limited or “Safe” Failure: Prevents failures from rippling across systems.
  4. Flexibility: The ability to change, evolve and adapt to alternative strategies in the face of disaster.
  5. Spare Capacity: Ensure there is a back up or alternative available when a vital component of a system fails.

Tiffany Wilson-Worsley, MCF government relations and public policy fellow

Photo cc mollyapolis



What Will It Take to Build a Beloved Community?

May 19, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-05-19 at 1.43.35 PMLast week a report on black male achievement commissioned by the Foundation Center and the Open Society Foundation was released: Building a Beloved Community: Strengthening the Field of Black Male Achievement.

The report builds on the 2012 study Where Do We Go From Here? Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boysmaps current work in the area of black male achievement and makes recommendations on what it will take to strengthen the field moving forward.

Based on interviews with 50 leaders in the social, academic, government and business sectors, the report takes stock of major sectors engaged in the field and examines opportunities for other constituencies — especially the corporate and faith sectors — to become more involved.

A “Rethink Philanthropy” chapter calls for longer funding commitments, increased general operating support, permanent endowments and other ways of moving beyond traditional philanthropy.

Susan Taylor Batten, CEO of ABFE, characterizes such efforts as transformational philanthropy and says:

“Ultimately, we have to find ways to ‘hard wire’ a race and gender lens into all investments rather than setting up special projects that are time-limited. The latter is important, but one of our goals is to change the sector so investments in black male achievement are not dependent on a particular leader.”

It is a timely release in light of a growing number of national initiatives focused on improving the economic, social and physical well-being of black males, including My Brother’s Keeper and the Executives’ Alliance to Expand Opportunities for Boys and Men of Color.

Beloved Community

The concept of a “Beloved Community” was popularized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as a core part of his philosophy.

According to The King Center: Dr. King’s Beloved Community is a global vision, in which all people can share in the wealth of the earth. In the Beloved Community, poverty, hunger and homelessness will not be tolerated because international standards of human decency will not allow it. Racism and all forms of discrimination, bigotry and prejudice will be replaced by an all-inclusive spirit of sisterhood and brotherhood. In the Beloved Community, international disputes will be resolved by peaceful conflict-resolution and reconciliation of adversaries, instead of military power. Love and trust will triumph over fear and hatred. Peace with justice will prevail over war and military conflict.

Sounds like a world worth working for.

- Susan Stehling, MCF communications associate

 


Minnesota Grantmakers at the White House

March 13, 2014

obama2In February, President Obama announced My Brother’s Keeper, an interagency initiative to determine what public and private efforts are working for young men and boys of color and how to expand upon them. Foundations nationally will direct at least $200 million toward the effort over the next five years in addition to $150 million already pledged or awarded.

Minnesota’s philanthropic community was well represented at the announcement. Here, Trista Harris, MCF president, and David Nicholson, executive director, Headwaters Foundation for Justice, reflect on their attendance at the historic announcement with Alfonso Wenker, MCF’s director of diversity, equity and inclusion.

Have you seen philanthropy and government come together like this before? What’s important about this moment?
DN:
I have seen foundations and government come together on a local level. I work with the Northside Funders Group where the state, city and county are working alongside foundations to identify common needs and opportunities for collective impact. But, most examples I can think of focus on a specific “it” – a policy or a solution – rather than on the whole.

TH: I think this could be a transformational moment for our country. It allows foundations to lift up best practices and scale up programs that support a consistently underserved population, while the government takes a systemic look – across all federal agencies – to ensure we are effectively serving men and boys of color.

What are the potential impacts for communities of color?
DN: This is an opportunity to focus on what works and finally move some of the persistent disparity numbers in health, wealth, education and opportunity for members of all communities.

TH: When we bring out the best in the most marginalized communities, we bring out the best in America as a whole.

What are the potential impacts for the community as a whole?
DN: We all have a vested interest in the success of everyone in our community. If one group, in this case boys and men of color, are many rungs behind on the opportunity ladder, it is prudent and strategic to focus on them.

TH: As a country, we can’t afford to leave anyone behind. We need the full participation of every American. By focusing on men and boys of color, we are strengthening communities for everyone.

What was it like being in a briefing with the President?
DN: For me personally, it was powerful to see the grandeur and size of the White House. It was very exciting to be in a room with so many people who have such a long commitment to this work.

TH: It was humbling and awe inspiring to be in the White House with a group of amazing people who have been working for decades to improve the lives of men and boys of color, to be joined by the President, who is personally committed to the effort, and to hear from a group of young men who will be impacted directly. It was the single most important experience in my professional career.

What opportunities are there for Minnesota to leverage this momentum?
DN: Minnesota momentum is critical. We have a long history of philanthropic leadership and thoughtful bipartisan initiatives, yet we have not been able to use that to address our dramatic and desperate outcomes for communities of color.

TH: There is great work happening in Minnesota, and this is an opportunity to connect it to national momentum. The African American Leadership Forum, Summit Academy, Brotherhood Inc., Harvest Prep School and Hiawatha Academy are all doing excellent work, so I look forward to Minnesota foundations and government leaders coming to the table and to Minnesota being one of the first states to scale its efforts.

Minnesota grantmakers are invited to continue the conversation at “My Brother’s Keeper: What’s Next for Minnesota?” a facilitated dialogue on Tuesday, March 25.



Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,817 other followers