Watch Highlights from Today’s Realities | Tomorrow’s Opportunities

November 12, 2014

The 2014 MCF Annual Conference is in the books! We’re very grateful to the hundreds of Minnesota grantmakers who joined us to discuss how we can seize new opportunities to have the most impact in the communities we serve.

If you couldn’t join us, or would just like a refresher on the learning and discussion that took place, don’t miss these great video highlights. First, a two-minute glimpse at the entire experience, start to finish:

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Then watch the full keynote from Stacy Palmer, editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy, on What’s Next: 10 Realities and Opportunities facing philanthropy in the coming years:

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Enjoy!


Fast Forward: Chris Cardona on Accessible Philanthropy

October 7, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 12.09.07 PMThe newest episode of MCF’s Fast Forward podcast featuring big thinkers in philanthropy is up!

In this episode, Alfonso Wenker sits down with Chris Cardona of TCC Group. They kick off their discussion with the three levels of accessible philanthropy Chris has seen grantmakers employ:

  1. Consult stakeholders about their decisions
  2. Integrate these communities into the decision-making process
  3. Get community involvement in the initial design process
Chris Cardona

Chris Cardona

The two go on to discuss the best entry point into this culture of accessibility, getting buy-in from leadership, and why equity and inclusion are such important concepts in discussions about diversity.

Listen to the podcast now! Then subscribe on iTunes or plug the RSS feed into the program of your choice.

Grantmakers, if you like what you hear, be sure to join us October 31 for Today’s Realities | Tomorrow’s Opportunities, MCF’s annual conference. Chris Cardona is one of the several prominent local and national speakers you’ll interact with throughout the day!


What’s Your Verb?

July 15, 2014
Jennifer Ford Reedy addressing the YNPN National Conference

Jennifer Ford Reedy addressing the YNPN National Conference

A couple of weeks ago, the national conference of the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network came to Minneapolis. As a board member of the local chapter, I was thrilled to see so many young leaders from around the country in town and for them to hear Jennifer Ford Reedy of the Bush Foundation during day two’s opening keynote.

One insight from Reedy’s keynote in particular has been sticking with me and others who attended. It came during her description of her career path and how she figured out what her dream job was. A lot of her career, she said, involved doing a good job and seeing what new opportunities emerged, but there was a pivotal moment — involving deep thinking and visualizing her dream job — that got her to where she is today.

That moment came with a question from a CEO she’d been working with. The question wasn’t, “What’s your dream job?” Instead the CEO asked, “Can we fund you to be you and keep doing what you’re doing in the community?” Reedy knew that wasn’t feasible and that she’d need to have a platform and a place to belong. But it did get her thinking, “What do I want to do? Not what job do I want, but what is the verb in my life?”

She thought about what she was good at, what she enjoyed doing and the impact she wanted to have. From there she considered organizations she could be a part of that would allow her to do that. That frame of mind allowed her to make conscious choices that led her to Bush Foundation.

Reedy’s story demonstrated that the familiar question about someone’s dream job might have it backwards. The most important thing to know is what you’ll be happy doing. The best place to do it flows from there, not vice versa. So what about it, what’s your verb?

Watch Reedy’s full keynote and Q&A session from the conference below:

- Chris Oien, MCF digital communications specialist


Make Your Nominations for the 2014 Minnesota Nonprofit Awards

May 21, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-05-21 at 4.02.19 PMThe Minnesota Council of Nonprofits and MAP for Nonprofits invite you to submit a nomination or application for a Mission or Excellence Award, to be presented at MCN’s annual conference in October.

The Nonprofit Mission Awards showcase the work of Minnesota’s outstanding nonprofits in the categories of:

  • Innovation
  • Anti-Racism Initiative
  • Advocacy
  • Responsive Philanthropy

Past winners of the Responsive Philanthropy award have included MCF members such as Elmer L. and Eleanor J. Andersen Foundation, Women’s Foundation of Minnesota and Headwaters Foundation for Justice.

Nominations are due May 30 and can be made through MCN’s website.

MAP for Nonprofits seeks nominations for the Nonprofit Excellence Awards, one for an organization with less than $1.5 million in annual operating expenses, and one for an organization with $1.5 million or more in expenses. These awards are based upon how closely organizations align with the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits Principles and Practices for Nonprofit Excellence.

Nominations for these awards are due May 29; see how to apply on MAP for Nonprofits’ website.

Best of luck to those being nominated!

 


Getting Networked by Nature

January 13, 2014

nbnWhen it comes to a tool like social media, it’s important to think beyond official messages sent out from an organization’s account.

The real power comes when people, including staff and board members who care about an organization, are empowered to spread the word as individuals. After all, social media is social, and people value interactions with other people above those with brands.

That was the message shared by Cary Walski, technology education and outreach coordinator at MAP for Nonprofits, at a technology breakout at the 2013 MCF Philanthropy Convening. Walski used statistics from the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network of the Twin Cities (where I also happen to be a board member) to make her point.

Traffic on the group’s website nearly tripled in one year, and event attendance increased 45 percent in the same time period. So how did they do it?

  1. YNPN-TC used social media as one part of a cohesive online communications strategy that also included a robust website and timely email marketing.
  2. YNPN-TC adopted a positive social media culture.

First Steps
In order for an organization to embrace a positive social media culture, several things must happen first.

  • Recognize that staff and board are always representing the organization; trust them to do it well on social media, as they do elsewhere.
  • Agree to a policy of 100 percent participation on social media, and include it in staff job descriptions.
  • Provide ongoing social media education
  • Write social media policies that are “Yes and,” instead of “No, no.”

Grantmakers Must Move Beyond Concern
Walski noted that grantmakers in particular may be hesitant to adopt a policy of complete availability on social media, fearing that it could lead to an increase of poorly-fitting grant proposals. However, she made the case that it’s time to move beyond concern and embrace openness. Here’s why:

  • Social media is a great way to promote and support the work of grantees.
  • It provides additional avenues for community members to reach out to foundation staff.
  • It may illuminate new opportunities for a foundation to meet mission and serve community.
  • It gives program staff new ways to learn about issues they care about.
  • It increases staff visibility, so they are increasingly looked to as thought leaders.

Roadmap
How does an organization transition to a positive social media culture? Here’s the roadmap Walski laid out:

  • Survey and Align: Determine who your internal staff and board enthusiasts are, and identify or hire a social media champion.
  • Build: Ensure your organization’s practices and policies encourage social media. Have your social media champions inspire and educate staff at informal gatherings such as brown bag lunches.
  • Evaluate: Demonstrate the value to leadership and board members by using metrics like those in Google Analytics. Share screenshots of particularly poignant social media “mission moments.”
  • Innovate: Stay on top of changing technology and help your organization find that next connection that will lead to improved service.

Through it all, don’t forget: people value interactions with other people above those with brands.

For further inspiration on jumpstarting your organization’s positive social media culture, check out Idealware’s The Nonprofit Social Media Decision Guide and Unleashing Innovation: Using Everyday Technology to Improve Nonprofit Services by Idealware and MAP for Nonprofits.

- Chris Oien, MCF digital communications specialist


A Good Food Future: The Healthy Foods, Healthy Communities Funders Network

January 8, 2014

healthyfoodToday on the blog we feature Pam Bishop, entrepreneur senior program officer, Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation. She presented at the 2013 MCF Philanthropy Convening about one of MCF’s member networks, the Healthy Foods, Healthy Communities Funders Network. She tells us more about it here.

At the November 2013 MCF Philanthropy convening, representatives from the Healthy Foods, Healthy Communities (HFHC) Funders Network introduced the network during an interactive breakout session. Here is some of what was covered:

Who We Are
The Healthy Foods, Healthy Communities Funders Network is a group of Minnesota-based funders who make informed, coordinated and strategic investments to improve key facets of our food system. Our shared commitment to the vitality and prosperity of our state’s communities and resilience of our landscapes inspire us to work together.

What We Do
This diverse group of funders:

  • Shares information about promising programs, organizations, issues and research.
  • Coordinates funding among members to ensure resources are well-distributed across organizations and initiatives focused on food systems.
  • Increases overall funding available for food systems-related work.
  • Convenes meetings for Minnesota’s funding community on relevant issues of interest around food systems and philanthropy.

Priorities
Our joint agenda for learning and investment is based on the concept of collective impact. It emphasizes three strategic priorities:

  1. Facilitate Local Entrepreneurship across the food supply chain.
  2. Improve Access to Healthy Food to enhance wellness and health equity for all Minnesotans.
  3. Strengthen and sustain Farmland Access throughout the state.

For the next three years, these priorities will inform the content of HFHC-sponsored meetings for the broader funding community. They will also influence strategies to align and increase funding.

Each priority has a working group that meets regularly to plan network-wide learning opportunities and execute a successful strategy to coordinate and increase funding.

Get Involved
If you are a funder interested in these issues, here are some ways for you to get involved with the Healthy Foods, Healthy Communities Funders Network:

  • Join the HFHC listserv by contacting Tara Kumar, member services manager at MCF.
  • Attend the HFHC public meeting in early 2014. Watch for details — coming soon.
  • Join one of the HFHC working groups to collaborate with other funders on strategic alignment of funding on an issue you care about. Contact Tara if interested.

Members
HFHC Funders Network has members from agencies, organizations and institutions that fund efforts to address social, environmental, economic and human health dimensions of food and agriculture in Minnesota.

For example: family, community and corporate foundations; state agencies, such as the Minnesota Department of Health; academic institutions, such as the University of Minnesota; health organizations, such as UCare and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota; and hunger relief groups such as United Way.

Photo cc NatalieMaynor

Engaging “New” Philanthropists

January 2, 2014
panel

Presenters (clockwise from top left) Kelly Drummer, Noelle Ito, Nareman Taha, Bo Thao-Urabe

Members of communities of color must look to their own communities to find new models of giving that will work there.

That was the overriding message at the “Everyone’s a Philanthropist” session at the 2013 MCF Philanthropy Convening, featuring presenters:

Each is a member of a community with a long tradition of giving coupled with growing assets – defined as skills, community knowledge and finances. Community members also have an increasing awareness of the lack of philanthropic investment in their communities and want to be part of solutions that create greater good. Here’s how they answered a few questions.

Tell us about your “cultures of giving.”

Bo Thao-Urabe: In Asian communities, your personal well-being is judged by the well-being of your family.

Noelle Ito: Don’t assume that donors from our communities are all young and financially strapped; it’s not true. For many of our donors, it’s about more than writing a check. People want to get their hands dirty and learn about issues in their communities. And, just because I’m Asian American, don’t assume I know about all Asian American issues.

Nareman Taha: It’s very much about one-on-one relationships. I recommend that people go into a community, learn about how its members look at donating and see if they can build on that tradition.

We started by doing focus groups in a number of communities and found that Arab Americans were charitable, but they gave as individuals. Many didn’t understand organized philanthropy. Now, as a community foundation, our giving is more visible. We say, “Look we’re an Arab-American organization that is supporting the community.”

Kelly Drummer: Reciprocity is very important in the Native American culture. The structure of the Tiwahe Foundation – giving from individuals to individuals – grew out of that culture.

We want to be around for a long time, so we knew we had to build our endowment. We are now asking for donations of $1,000 –and spread over five years, that’s just $17 a month.

What’s the best way to engage with new communities and populations?

Thao-Urabe: It’s about relationships. Get to know a community and how they support each other. Work with the community to determine what kind of investment it needs to build its future. Get community members to see themselves as donors. Many of them already give, but they do it without recognition.

Determine how community members can combine their traditional values with the tools of American philanthropy.

Taha: Build relationships with existing religious and social service organizations that are already working in the community. Associating your work with theirs can increase your credibility.

Drummer: It’s about getting people to realize that giving in small amounts matters. You don’t need to have a lot of money to give. I say, “If you think you can’t give $120, how about if you give $10 each month for a year?”

How do your organizations work with foundations?

Ito: Foundations serve as fiscal agents for our giving circles, so they process our checks. Many of our giving circles also have a 50 percent foundation match.

Taha: W.K. Kellogg Foundation and others have lent us their expertise, their research and their support. They have been extremely helpful.

Drummer: The Minneapolis Foundation has provided a home for our endowment. We partner with Blandin Foundation and Bush Foundation on leadership development programs.

- Susan Stehling, MCF communications associate


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