Inequities – Experienced by Some – Threaten All

April 23, 2014

FRSeveral days ago I received an email from Marketplace with the subject line: Forget the 1%. The 0.01% owns 12% of all wealth in America. When I clicked through, things got worse: Around 50 percent of the US population has zero net wealth. Their debts, effectively, equal their assets.

Despite some familiarity with income inequality and persistent poverty in the U.S., the reality of so much being owned by so few and of so many owning nothing at all hit hard.

Even with the Great Recession behind us, numbers that reinforce the harsh realities of racial and economic disparity are released daily. “The Urgency of Now: Foundations’ Role in Ending Racial Inequity” in the latest issue of The Foundation Review presents many of the issues and the depth of the challenge we find ourselves in. It surveys philanthropy’s evolution in addressing poverty and traces a long history of the racialization of institutions and systems.

But the article, by Gary Cunningham, Northwest Area Foundation; Marcia Avner, University of Minnesota — Duluth; and Romilda Justilien, BCT Partners also explores multiple approaches that foundations can use to advance racial equity and prosperity. And it offers specific approaches used by the Northwest Area Foundation, an MCF member, that others working for equity could also employ.

MCF and many of its members work in multiple ways to advance equity. By equity, we mean the conditions that will exist when factors such as racial, ethnic, economic and geographic differences are no longer predictors of life outcomes. We believe it’s important because inequities experienced by some threaten the future prosperity of all.

- Susan Stehling, MCF communications associate


Fast Forward with Philanthropy’s Big Thinkers

April 22, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 12.09.07 PMMCF is pleased to announce the launch of our new Fast Forward series!

Through these monthly videos and periodic podcasts of interviews by MCF President Trista Harris, Fast Forward will feature conversations with big thinkers in the field of philanthropy.

You’ll learn about the latest trends in Minnesota grantmaking, gain insights on strategies behind important philanthropic efforts and come away inspired with ideas and approaches you can take back to your organization.

We’re launching with an interview with Margaret A. Cargill Foundation’s Mark Lindberg, director of the Relief and Resilience program. Here, Mark tells Trista about the foundation’s work in the area of disaster relief and resiliency building, its focus on lower-attention events that don’t typically receive much philanthropic support and its interest in engaging local community members as key partners:

The full transcript of this interview is available on our website, which is also where you’ll also find new Fast Forward episodes as we produce them. Interview highlights are also featured in the spring issue of Giving Forum, in your mailbox soon.

Let us know what you think! And look for a conversation with Phil Buchanan of the Center for Effective Philanthropy to come in May.


Wells Fargo Community Funding Council Announces Grants for Seniors and Healthy Living

April 21, 2014

Wells_Fargo_4cEach year, the Wells Fargo Community Funding Council (WFCFC), comprised of Wells Fargo team members from the Twin Cities area, makes grants to Twin Cities area nonprofits.

In 2014, the WFCFC has announced it will fund one-time, non-recurring expenses up to $12,000 to Twin Cities nonprofits that provide services to low- and moderate-income, aging-in-place seniors (age 65 and older) to promote a healthy lifestyle through nutrition and/or physical activity.

The Community Funding Council defines nutrition as access to food, nutritional education, or it may be making healthier choices, or having access to fresher, healthier food. Eligible nonprofits must have a minimum of three years of direct senior programming. Due to limited funding, it is unable to fund home health care agencies, senior housing, or hospitals.

Special consideration will be given to programs that can demonstrate:

  • Commitment to delivering high quality and culturally relevant programs to seniors
  • Ability to address other basic needs through in-house direct services or through formal partnerships with other agencies
  • Programs that offset the risk of isolation by engaging seniors in community gardens, volunteer activities, social gatherings, and one-on-one companionship

To learn more, read the RFP solicitation letter released by the Funding Council.

Those interested in applying should use the CyberGrant online application, with reference invitation code MNEC2014.

Applicants should refer to the Wells Fargo Community Funding Council Online Grant Application Instructions on the website for FAQs and required grant information.

Proposals must be received by Friday, May 2, 2014 at midnight.


MCF Seeks Program Assistant

April 17, 2014

helpMCF is hiring again! Our Program Strategy team seeks a dynamic and motivated individual to fill a new position.

In this highly visible and fast-paced role, the Program Assistant:

  • Serves as the first point of contact for many of MCF’s committees, networks and task forces by preparing correspondence, arranging conference calls, scheduling meetings, creating and disseminating minutes.
  • Takes initiative in providing timely and effective administrative support to the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Director of Member Services and the Director of Public Policy and Government Relations.
  • Supports MCF’s program operations, including database and technological support.
  • Prioritizes and manage multiple projects simultaneously, and follows through on issues in a timely manner to ensure program directors achieve strategic goals.
  • Provides strategic insight during development of Council programs and activities to eliminate duplication of efforts and ensure quality program delivery.

Selection criteria for this position include:

  • Outstanding verbal and written skills on the phone, in email and in person.
  • Warm and welcoming presence; commitment to hospitality and customer service.
  • Strategic, critical thinker with an insatiable curiosity about finding creative solutions.
  • Attention to detail and accuracy.

And required experience includes:

  • High school diploma or GED equivalent and a minimum of five years of administrative assistant experience, including executive assistant level responsibilities, direct customer service support and reception or a two-year degree in administrative assistance and two years of experience.
  • Well-developed verbal and written communication skills.
  • Tech savvy with proficiency with current office technology
  • Experience managing event logistics.
  • Experience managing committees.
  • Previous nonprofit, philanthropic or membership association work experience.

See the full job description on our website, and help us spread the word! Applications are due May 9.

Photo cc Matt Wetzler

Twins, MLB Open All-Star Grant Initiative

April 16, 2014

480_fans_chooseWith the 2014 Major League Baseball All-Star Game coming to the Twin Cities, the Minnesota Twins and MLB announced they are creating the first “All-Star Fans Choose” grant initiative, which will award $500,000 to a nonprofit in the Upper Midwest for a capital project to benefit its community.

Nonprofits in Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota and western Wisconsin may apply now through May 23.

Five finalists will be determined by a panel of judges consisting of representatives from MLB before the fans can vote for their favorite project from June 10 to July 10. The judges will determine the final five 501(c)(3) nonprofit projects based on these criteria:

  • Impact on community
  • Scope
  • Timeline,
  • Environmental improvement and sustainable design
  • Quality of application

The program is the first of its kind, and will be one of several community outreach projects leading up to the All-Star Game on July 15. In recent years, the Midsummer Classic has annually brought roughly $5 million to local charities.

“The All-Star Fans Choose grant initiative is one of the most unique community efforts that Major League Baseball has ever put in place for the Midsummer Classic,” Commissioner Bud Selig said. “This program will be an important element of our All-Star summer efforts and will help us leave a lasting legacy in the communities of the Twin Cities.”

Read more and access the application at the All-Star Fans Choose Grant Program webpage, and stay tuned for other projects to be announced in the coming months.

Good luck to those applying!


Inspiration, Renewed Commitments at the Ambassador Awards

April 10, 2014
The Saint Paul Foundation's Carleen Rhodes with this year's Ambassador Awards honorees.

Minnesota Philanthropy Partners’ Carleen Rhodes with this year’s Ambassador Awards honorees.

On April 7, The Saint Paul Foundation held its annual Facing Race Ambassador Awards. The purpose of this event is to honor “…individuals working to build communities where everyone feels safe, valued and respected.”

This year, over 500 people came out to celebrate and honor this work. It was fantastic to see such a multi-generational crowd. Attendees included youth, elected officials, and those from the nonprofit, philanthropic, education, business, and government sectors.

Carleen Rhodes and Rowzat Shipchandler opened the event with an overview of Minnesota Philanthropy Partners’ renewed commitment to racial equity including the racial equity framework. This framework will promote racial equity through the various roles of the foundation: as community participants, economic entities, funders, employers, fundraisers, and leaders.

People were nominated from all across the state. This year, there were two Ambassador Award recipients, Jada Sherrie Mitchell and Justin Terrell, and three Honorable Mention recipients, Jennifer Godinez, Bukata Hayes and Dr. Cecilia Martinez. The Ambassador Award winners each received a $10,000 grant and the Honorable Mention winners each received a $1,000 grant that they may present to the nonprofit of their choice.

Award winning local photographer, Wing Young Huie, was the keynote speaker. He asked questions such as “How much does society shape ideas of who we are,” “Who gets to say who is a Minnesotan,” “When are we different and when are we the same,” and “Are we aware of our subconscious assumptions?” He demonstrated the power of the media across space and time, showing how some reactions to one photo were strongly influenced by images and assumptions from the Vietnam War many decades earlier.

It was a wonderful night of greeting old friends and meeting new ones, building the beloved community, and renewing personal commitments to advance this work.

- Jennifer Pennington, MCF member services fellow


Apply Now for the 2014 Bush Prize

April 9, 2014

Bush-AltLogo-ColorYesterday, the Bush Foundation announced it has opened applications for its 2014 Bush Prize for Community Innovation. This prize honors and supports innovative organizations with a track record of making great ideas happen. The Bush Prize provides creative capital for the organizations to use however they choose.

Open to public charities and government entities in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and 23 Native nations that share the same geography, selection criteria for the Bush Prize include:

  • Does the organization have a pattern of innovative solutions?
  • Does the organization have a pattern of using inclusive, collaborative and resourceful processes?
  • Does the organizational leadership foster a culture of innovation?
  • Is the organization stable and strong in terms of governance and finance?

Applications are due June 5. Finalists will be chosen in July, with site visits in August and September. Winners will be selected in November, with funds dispersed in December.

Prize winners receive a package of recognition, along with a flexible grant of 25% of the organization’s last fiscal year budget, up to $500,000. See the stories of the nine winners from 2013.

Visit the Bush Foundation’s website for all the details and to access the online application. Best of luck to those applying!

 


C.H. Robinson Honored for Workplace Giving

April 7, 2014

chEarlier this month, MCF member C.H. Robinson received the Community Impact Award in the Workplace Giving Campaign category from Minnesota Business magazine. The honor recognizes a successful volunteer or employee-giving campaign benefiting any non-profit or other worthy organization.

This is the second year in a row that Minnesota Business has recognized C.H. Robinson in the Workplace Giving Campaign category in recognition of various employee volunteer campaigns that the company facilitates. This year, C.H. Robinson was presented the award for the company’s 14 years of support and dedication to the MinnDakotas chapter of JDRF, the leading global organization focused on type 1 diabetes research.

Each year, C.H. Robinson’s employees gather at the Mall of America in Bloomington, MN to participate in the annual Walk to Cure Diabetes. What began as a small group of employees who participated in the Walk in 2001, has now grown to 645 Team Robinson walkers who participated in this year’s walk.

“We are proud of the work our employees do to make C.H. Robinson a great company,” said Angie Freeman, vice president of human resources at C.H. Robinson. “Awards like this are a reminder that giving back is embedded in our company culture and that the same ingenuity and hard work that help us succeed as a company, also help make our communities better places to live and work.”

Learn More About Corporate Giving

Corporate giving often extends beyond giving grants. Noncash charitable contributions include employee volunteer time such as this and donated goods and services. To learn more about Minnesota’s corporate giving landscape, see our January blog post, and our Giving in Minnesota and Grantmaker Rankings research.

Congratulations to C.H. Robinson!


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